Home 54° Across Africa Mali: Kidnapped French journalist appeals for help, Rwandan deported from U.S. denies genocide charges | 5 Things That Should Matter Today

Mali: Kidnapped French journalist appeals for help, Rwandan deported from U.S. denies genocide charges | 5 Things That Should Matter Today

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Mali: Kidnapped French journalist appeals for help, Rwandan deported from U.S. denies genocide charges | 5 Things That Should Matter Today

Across the 54 Countries in Africa, these are the 5 top stories you may have missed:


Mali: Kidnapped French journalist appeals for help

A video circulating over social media shows kidnapped French journalist Olivier Dubois pleading for help after he was kidnapped in Mali by Islamist militants – Africa News reports

“I’m Olivier Dubois. I’m French. I’m a journalist. I was kidnapped in Gao on April 8 by the JNIM (al Qaeda North Africa). I’m speaking to my family, my friends and the French authorities for them to do everything in their power to free me,” Dubois said in a 21-second video shared on social media,” Oliver said in the video.

The French foreign ministry confirmed his disappearance but stopped short of calling it a kidnapping.


Rwandan deported from U.S. denies genocide charges

A Rwandan woman deported by the United States and facing charges related to the 1994 genocide in Rwanda appeared in court on Wednesday where she denied the charges against her – Reuters Africa reports

Speaking in a Rwandan court on Wednesday, 5th May, Beatrice Munyenyezi sobbed and said: “It’s fake. I wonder why,” adding that she was a pregnant teenager during the genocide and did not have the power to do any of the things she stands accused of, such as mounting roadblocks where ethnic Tutsis were then killed.


Zimbabwe considers first mass elephant killing in decades

Southern African country, Zimbabwe, is considering the mass killing of elephants, known as culling, for the first time since 1988 to reduce the 100,000 population of the animals – Aljazeera Africa reports

The Zimbabwean government which has the world’s second-largest population of elephants after neighbouring Botswana has maintained that the large number of animals is leading to the destruction of habitat needed by other species and an increasing number of dangerous human-elephant interactions.

Adult elephants can eat 300 kilograms (660 pounds) of vegetation a day and often strip bark from trees, killing them.


Magashule ‘suspends’ Ramaphosa

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